Cleveland Works

The factory is named on the 1902 Ordnance Survey map as Cleveland Works, where hoops etc. are made.

By 1930 the site had been acquired by Herbertson & Company Limited, constructional engineers, previously based in Lever Street.

The factory became known as Beaconsfield Works.

The company manufactured structural steelwork, and erected, and maintained, all types of steel buildings.

Large quantities of structural steel were kept in stock and the highly skilled staff ensured that all kinds of work could be undertaken.

Herbertson & Company manufactured steel-framed buildings, roofs, riveted girders, stanchions, steel storage bunkers, hoppers, crane gantries and runways, and elevator and conveyor steelwork.

 Customers included the Admiralty, the Air Ministry, and the War Office.


An advert from 1930.


An advert from 1936.

An advert from 1949.


An advert from 1956 showing the construction of the University's building in Stafford Street.

An advert from 1959.    


An advert from 1962.


An advert from 1935.

British Oil Works
In 1848 Gaunt and Hickman established the British Oil Works, one of the first businesses in the country to produce oil and grease.

In the early years their main customers were from the coal mining industry, but with the development of the internal combustion engine this all changed, and the business rapidly grew.

There were disastrous fires at the factory in 1887 and 1911, but each time the business survived.


A view inside the oil works.


Another view inside the works.

Large quantities of lubricants were produced for the armed forces during the First World War, and the company began to supply cutting oils, and lubricants for every type of machine.

The company’s products were always made to the highest standards, and constant research was undertaken to improve the existing products, and to develop new products.

By the end of the First World War the business had moved to Bilston Road, Wolverhampton, alongside the canal.


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