The Dartmouth Arms which stood on the corner of High Street and Dorsett Road. It was known as "The Blazing Stump".

The pub was demolished in readiness for the building of St. Lawrence Way.

From the collection of the late Howard Madeley.

 
The original Why Not Inn in The Green. Photographed by the late W. J. Ashmore in the 1930s. Courtesy of John and Christine Ashmore.
An atmospheric shot of the now demolished Railway Tavern in Cemetery Road. The photograph was taken by the late W. J. Ashmore during a wet night on 1st January, 1939.

Courtesy of John and Christine Ashmore.

 


The Nag's Head in The Green. From the collection of the late Howard Madeley.


The Royal Oak in Booth Street. From the collection of the late Howard Madeley.

 
 


The Dog and Pheasant in Blockall, known as 'The Wrexham'. From the collection of the late Howard Madeley.

The Waggon and Horses in King Street.

From the collection of the late Howard Madeley.


The White Lion in King Street. Taken by Richard Ashmore. Courtesy of John and Christine Ashmore.

 


Eldon Street and the Bradford Arms. From the collection of the late Howard Madeley.


The Bradford Arms, better known as The Frying Pan, in it's last few years before demolition. Taken by Richard Ashmore. Courtesy of John and Christine Ashmore.


A closer view of the Bradford Arms, taken by Richard Ashmore. Courtesy of John and Christine Ashmore.


Another view of the Bradford Arms.

A close-up view of the front.

From the collection of the late Howard Madeley.

The Bradford Arms, sometime between 1901 and 1923 when the licensee and owner was William Howells, a brewer, born in Church Stretton in 1838.

He was succeeded as licensee by his wife Rachel Ann Howells who was 31 years younger than her husband.

The pub was originally called the Hatherton Arms.

Externally the building changed considerably, as can be seen from the other photos.

 

From the collection of the late Howard Madeley.


A side view of the Bradford Arms, taken by Richard Ashmore. Courtesy of John and Christine Ashmore.


A sad occasion, the last night at the Frying Pan, which closed in 1982. Courtesy of Doug Cherrington.


A final view of the Bradford Arms, taken by Richard Ashmore. Courtesy of John and Christine Ashmore.


The White Dog at number 46 Bilston Street wasn't far from the Bradford Arms.


The Barley Mow in Cross Street. From the collection of the late Howard Madeley.

 
 


The Vine in Bell Street. From the collection of the late Howard Madeley.


The Bulls Head in High Street. From the collection of the late Howard Madeley.

 
 


The Castle Inn in Foster Street. From the collection of the late Howard Madeley.


The Seven Stars on The Leys. From the collection of the late Howard Madeley.

 


George Golcher behind the bar at the Old Barrel. Courtesy of David Adams.


A trip from the Old Barrel to Wolverhampton. Courtesy of David Adams.


The Swan in Victoria Road.


The Swan, as seen in February 2009.

 


Another view of The Swan, from December, 2010.


The Swan at night, as seen in December 2010.


A very sad sight. The boarded-up Swan, as seen in late November 2012. Luckily the Swan, which is one of Darlaston's most attractive pubs, was only closed for a few weeks. Thanks to the SOS campaign (Save Our Swan) it has been given a new lease of life, and reopened on Friday 7th December, 2012.
 

Two views taken inside the reopened Swan on 10th December, 2012.


Another view inside the Swan. Also taken on 10th December, 2012.

A lovely sketch of the interior of the Swan drawn by the talented artist Austin Moseley in 1972.

It hangs on the wall in the bar.

Another of Austin Moseley's sketches of the Swan, which is also hanging on the wall in the bar.


The Aladdin's Lamp in Wiley Avenue, built in 1962 to replace The Lamp in Foundry Street. It has since been converted into apartments.


The Aladdin's Lamp today, now apartments.


The Staffordshire Knot in Catherine's Cross.


The Staffordshire Knot in the 1970s. Taken by Richard Ashmore. Courtesy of John and Christine Ashmore.


The Duke of York in Moxley Road. Taken by Richard Ashmore. Courtesy of John and Christine Ashmore.


The Royal Exchange also in Catherine's Cross, is better known as "The Widdows" or "Widders". It was built around 1870.

This photograph taken in December 2010 shows the empty pub up for sale. It has now been converted into apartments.


The Vine in Bell Street.


The Red Lion in Moxley Road.


The New Junction in Forge Road taken in May 2008 showing two "For Sale" signs.


The New Junction as it is today, back in business.


A group of regulars outside the rear of the New Junction pub in the 1920s. Courtesy of the late Bill Whitehouse.

Back Row standing, left to right: Mr. King, ?, Joe Whitehouse, George Woolley,
Dick Whitehouse,?,?
Middle Row seated, left to right: Harry Lunn, Bill Whitehouse, ?, Tom Whitehouse, ?
Front Row left to right: Tom Marney, Bill Holden, and Alf Bliss.
Mrs. Morgan from Factory Street is looking through the window.
    


The Boat, by the canal in Bentley Road South. The original Boat pub, built around 1818, stood on the opposite side of the canal. The pub was demolished and rebuilt in about 1935, and refurbished in 1995.


The Boat as it was in April 2007 after a mindless arson attack.

The Boat in December 2007 in an even worse state of dereliction.


Another view from December 2007.


A rear view, also from December 2007.


A view of the interior as it was in December 2007.


Another view of the interior.


A final view of the interior.


The Moxley Arms, High Street, Moxley in a very sorry state. The empty building has been the victim of several arson attacks. It is seen as it was at the beginning of March 2008, two months before demolition.


Another view of the last days of the Moxley Arms.


The Victoria Inn in Walsall Road, just before demolition.


Christmas celebrations at the Victoria Inn in the mid 1960s. George Smith is playing Father Christmas. Courtesy of George's daughter, Irene Bishop.


Herberts Park Tavern in Forge Road.


Herberts Park Tavern in 2010.


The Three Horse Shoes. From an old postcard.


The Three Horseshoes in the 1970s. Taken by Richard Ashmore. Courtesy of John and Christine Ashmore.


The Old Castle Hotel in Pinfold Street, demolished for the building of St Lawrence way.


An advert from 1900.


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