In 1992 the Polytechnic was granted university status and became the University of Wolverhampton. Walsall Campus then became Wolverhampton University's Sports and Art Campus, and School of Education. During the decade there were many changes at main site. Departments grew and for a time occupied a number of buildings in the surrounding area. The old St. Peter's School buildings were demolished and the Robert Scott library was extended.
The following is from the 1993 Staff Handbook

Faculties and Schools

The Faculty of Arts, Design and Social Studies:
The School of Art and Design
The School of Humanities and Social Sciences

The Faculty of Business, Law and European Studies:
The Wolverhampton Business School
The School of Legal Studies
The School of Languages and European Studies

The Faculty of Education:
The School of Education

The Faculty of Science and Technology:
The School of Applied Sciences
The School of Health Sciences
The School of Computing and Information Technology
The School of Construction, Engineering and Technology

There were Finance and Personnel Departments
The Estates Department
The Academic Affairs Office
The Academic Planning and Systems Unit
The Chaplaincy Centre
The Computer Centre
Library Services
Printing Services
Counselling and Guidance Service
Nursery Facilities
Public Relations Department
The Students’ Union

There were also plenty of eating places:
School of Art and Design snack bar
Main Site Refectory
Main Site Dining Room
Students’ Union coffee bar
School of Health Sciences snack bar
Staff Common Room in ‘C Block’
Compton Park Refectory
Dudley Refectory
Walsall Refectory
Walsall snack bar
Walsall Staff Common Room

Nursery facilities were available at the Randall Lines Hall of Residence in North Road and at Broadway Hall of Residence, Priory Road, Dudley. In 1993-1994 there were 23,511 students and 1,700 places in the halls of residence.

In 1994 Telford Campus in the grounds of Priorslee Hall was completed and opened its doors to students from the Business School and the Faculty of Science and Engineering. In October 1995, Wolverhampton Science Park opened. It was a collaboration between the university and the local authority, formed to forge links between the university's research departments and local industry.

Also in 1995 the School of Nursing and Midwifery was formed at Walsall campus after the amalgamation of the United Midlands College for Nursing and Midwifery and the Sister Dora School of Nursing. Two years later the university established a virtual learning environment called WOLF, which was short for Wolverhampton Online Learning Framework. It was used by both staff and students.

Also in the 1990s the Academic Planning and Systems Unit moved to Quadrant Chambers in Princes Square.

In 1998 two new learning centres opened, one on main site and the other at the Telford campus, both consisting of a traditional library with high tech facilities.


The University occupied this building in Lichfield Street in 1994 and used it for several years. It was known as MU Block and housed the School of Computing and Information Technology which moved from main site. Courtesy of David Parsons.
It is now a row of shops with Wolverhampton Post Office in the middle and privately run student accommodation above.

The entrance to MU Block. Courtesy of David Parsons. The building was previously Midshires Building Society and the counter and windows are left-overs from Midshires.


The technicians' room in MU Block. Courtesy of David Parsons.


Another part of the technicians' room in MU Block. Courtesy of David Parsons.


David Parsons' office in MU Block. Courtesy of David Parsons.


Part of the server/switch room in MU Block. Courtesy of David Parsons.


Another part of the MU Block server/switch room. Courtesy of David Parsons.


The technicians' room in 'G Block'. Courtesy of David Parsons.


In the mid 1990s the old buildings that were once part of St. Peter's School were demolished to make way for the rear extension to the Robert Scott Library, beginning with the old huts. Courtesy of David Parsons.


The old St. Peter's School buildings slowly disappear. They had been used by the Geography Department. Courtesy of David Parsons.


The demolition continues. Courtesy of David Parsons.


Only one of the old school buildings still awaited demolition. Courtesy of David Parsons.


The demolition site is tidied-up in readiness for the building of the extension. Courtesy of David Parsons.


As the school buildings disappear, work on the extension to the library gets underway. Courtesy of David Parsons.


The view from 'C Block' looking towards Princes Square and Wulfruna Street. Courtesy of David Parsons.


The roof tiles are removed from the old St. Peter's School building. Courtesy of David Parsons.


Another view of the old school buildings before they disappear. Courtesy of David Parsons.


The roof soon disappears. Courtesy of David Parsons.


Demolition rapidly continues. Courtesy of David Parsons.


The final school building awaits demolition. Courtesy of David Parsons.


When the site had been tidied-up, work rapidly progressed on the library extension. Courtesy of David Parsons.


The rear extension to the Robert Scott Library takes shape. Courtesy of David Parsons.


The extension nears completion. Courtesy of David Parsons.


A final view of the extension. Courtesy of David Parsons. The front of the building was later extended and the building became the Harrison Learning Centre.

By the early 1990s the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, part of the Faculty of Arts, Design and Social Studies was based at the Dudley Campus. It was a large site covering 24.76 acres.

A view of part of the Dudley Campus, from Castle View. On the left is the hedge alongside the playing field. Courtesy of David Parsons.

Another view of the Dudley Campus looking towards the main entrance. The buildings were originally part of Dudley Teacher Training College, which opened in 1905. The buildings were demolished some years ago and the site is now occupied by a private housing estate. Courtesy of David Parsons.

The Health and Safety Group standing outside the main entrance at Dudley Campus. At the back on the left is Colin Farr. Courtesy of David Parsons.


Another view of the Dudley Campus. Courtesy of David Parsons.


A final view of the Dudley Campus. Courtesy of David Parsons.

By the late 1990s the Arena Theatre was in desperate need of expansion and so with investment from the university and a National Lottery grant, a £2 million refurbishment began. After 18 months of building work, the new theatre opened in October 1999 and could then cater for 200 public performances per year.

In 1998, Mick Harrison, who had been Vice-Chancellor of Wolverhampton University since it was founded, retired at the age of 56. He was replaced by John Brooks.

In 1999, the new SC building at the Telford campus opened for the DELTA department and the Competitiveness Centre, both dealing with information and communication technologies in education. The Competitiveness Centre was aimed at local businesses.

Jay's Cafe

An important service industry to staff and students alike was Jay's Cafe that stood across the road in Stafford Street. It was run by Tony and Chris Jay who offered an excellent service, excellent food and a warm welcome to all customers. It was always an enjoyable experience to go there for a cup of tea or coffee and some food. It was very popular. Daily visitors included Peter Strangman from SCIT and Vic Knowles from Geography.

The business started in 1972 in part of what later became the Hogs Head pub. When the pub expanded, the business moved further down the street to number 175. I can't sing its praises high enough. It was always a pleasure to go there, a nice break from work, somewhere to relax for a short time with colleagues. In 2012 a new shop front was added.


Tony and Chris Jay.

The business ran for about 44 years, until Tony and Chris started their well-earned retirement in 2015.


Jay's Cafe seen from the Millennium City Building in 2002.


Tony and Chris's first cafe, where the Hogs Head is today.


   
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